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English Department

Team Leaders:
Ashley Keilbarth
Michael Sanchez


Staff:

Kevin Balder

Martha Bedeaux

Maria Elena Casanova
Jerome Evans

Rosemary Hood
Doug Mattson

Trey Saxon

Susan Schripsema
Tanya Shaw
Casey Soto
Aimee Wray
Jim Zalewski

Language Arts Department Electives and Alternatives

Italicized wording is specific to La Cueva High School.
√ Freshmen may take this class.    *NCAA approved course.

 

The English program of La Cueva High School focuses on promoting excellence in all forms of communication, levels of critical thinking, and love of literature to the end that the students will be informed, involved, rational, compassionate, contributing citizens in their immediate, as well as the global society.

Students who take a Language Arts class for English credit (rather than elective credit) are expected to meet or exceed the New Mexico Language Arts Standards and Benchmarks. Students in all Language Arts classes apply and develop critical thinking skills through the six APS Language Arts Strands: Reading Process, Reading Analysis, Writing, Speaking, Listening/Viewing, and Research.

The following courses may be taken as electives in the grades indicated or may substitute for a required English course. College-bound students wishing to enroll in these courses should do so on an elective basis in addition to the required English course.

COLLEGE PREP COMPOSITION

24531      1 Sem.      12

Prerequisite: English 9, 10, 11
Special Requirements: Elective credit if not taken in conjunction with Mythology and Folklore in the spring semester.
Description: In College Prep Composition, the student engages in a concentrated study of the writing process in expository writing and the art of rhetoric in persuasive writing. The student practices writing various types of essays and compositions to prepare for college-level writing. Models such as 6 Plus One! Traits are used to help the student develop ideas, organization, voice, style, and fluency in written work, including revision and polishing work for publication. The student reads exemplary works by authors from around the world and creates traditional and/or electronic portfolios to show progress of work over time using technology as a learning, writing, and research tool

In College Prep Composition, students write restaurant, music and art reviews, examine media and pop culture, and develop their individual voices while also generating their own topics to explore the world in which we live (as is true of many college composition courses). Students will enjoy many opportunities to develop reading and critical thinking skills as they employ standard usage in speaking and listening, research, and (of course) writing. As they choose, students may also write for contests and college scholarships.

This course is offered in the fall semester in conjunction with Mythology and Folklore (22037) in the spring. Taken together, these two courses follow a college pattern and fulfill requirements for senior English, meeting or exceeding all Standards for Language Arts required by the State of New Mexico and APS.

*MYTHOLOGY & FOLKLORE IN LITERATURE

22037      1 Sem.      12

Prerequisite: English 9, 10, 11
Special Requirements: Elective credit if taken at Grade 11 and taken in conjunction with Mythology and Folklore in the spring semester; will satisfy English requirement if taken at Grade 12.
Description: In Mythology and Folklore, the student identifies and compares the survivals of past and present beliefs, customs, traditions, and rituals, including oral and written myths, legends, stories, riddles, proverbs, nursery rhymes, superstitions, plant and animal lore, and spiritual histories. The student analyzes central themes that attempt to explain the meaning of existence and how archetypes and images are used in literature to evoke reader response. Technology is used as a writing, research, and learning tool.

Students explore connections between ancient stories and modern lives as they discover how mythology provides a foundation for modern thought in both literature and popular culture (for example, before psychology, people had mythology). Students will have many opportunities to develop reading, writing, and critical thinking skills (one-half of the course is devoted to writing).

This course is offered in the spring semester in conjunction with College Prep Composition (24531) in the fall. Taken together, these two courses follow a college pattern and fulfill requirements for senior English, meeting or exceeding all Standards for Language Arts required by the State of New Mexico and APS.

*BIBLE LITERATURE

21533      1 Yr.      11-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of previous English class.
Special Requirements: Elective if taken at Grade 11; will satisfy English requirement if taken at Grade 12.
Description: In Bible Literature, the student reads and explores the literature that exists in both the Old and New Testaments. In addition to studying literary devices and vocabulary, the student studies history, civilizations, character studies, and themes. The student also examines the Bible’s form and structure (e.g., historical recitals, folktales, covenant renewals, prophetic oracles and apocalyptic literature, parables, stories of healing, sayings, and legal commentary). The student applies critical thinking skills through reading, speaking, viewing and listening strands of language arts through writing and research. One half of the course work is devoted to composition.

√ *JOURNALISM

24031      1 Yr.      9-12

Prerequisite: None
Special Requirements: None.
Description: In Journalism, the student explores and practices the fundamentals of various print and electronic media including newspapers, magazines, yearbooks, and radio/television/digital broadcasts. Areas of emphasis include interviewing and reporting techniques, gathering and researching sources of information, history, law and ethics, First Amendment rights and responsibilities, and media literacy. Special emphasis is placed on distinctive types of journalistic writing, style, and organization as compared to conventional English Composition. The student writes, edits, and evaluates news, editorials, columns, features, sports, photo captions, advertising copy, and investigative reports with clear purpose, accuracy, and awareness of the audience(s). The student contributes work for consideration to school and community productions (newspaper, yearbook, magazine and/or radio/TV/digital) and produces individual and class projects for publication or broadcast. Students will have the opportunity to participate in academic field trips, competitions, and conferences. This course grants elective credit.

*SHAKESPEARE

21542      1 Yr.      11-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of previous English class.
Special Requirements: Elective if taken at Grade 11; will satisfy English requirement if taken at Grade 12. Students are required to be reading above grade level and have good writing skills. While students are encouraged to buy their own copies of the works, books are available for checkout from the media center.
Description: In Shakespeare, the student studies William Shakespeare’s life, Elizabethan politics, theatre of the period, and his dramatic techniques. The student reads, studies, discusses, recites and enacts Shakespeare’s masterpieces (including the comedies, histories, tragedies, and romances) and his non-dramatic poetry (including narrative poems and sonnets). Technology is used as a research and learning tool. One half of the course work is devoted to composition.

MODERN FICTION

21535 1 Sem. 11-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 11 (or substitute).
Special Requirements: None.
Description: In Modern Fiction, the student surveys the development of a wide variety of 20th and 21st Century literature from the modern era to post modernism including contemporary readings from around the world. Popular literature will be selected that reflects modern cultural developments and trends and focuses on how the literature illuminates and informs modern societies. Readings reflect several trends of modern fiction related to various global, societal, and cultural issues. This course grants elective credit.

SCIENCE FICTION

21541      1 Sem.      11-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 10.
Special Requirements: None.
Description: This class will examine real-world politics, technological innovation and research as a background and foundation for the study of the Science Fiction literary genre. In Science Fiction, the student investigates the human condition (particularly in the realms of science, technology, political science and futurology) and the nature of reality by exploring alternative worlds and fictitious societies, situations, and characters. The student studies the genre from the 18th-20th Century, including its history, impact on the respective time period, and influence on subsequent “mainstream” and science fiction writers. The student also examines the genre subcategories of science, hard science fiction, and soft science fiction and writes original science fiction for personal collections and/or possible publication to literary magazines. Technology will be used to support learning. This course grants elective credit.

PSYCHOLOGY IN LITERATURE

22038      1 Sem.      11-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 11 (or substitute).
Special Requirements: None.
Description: In Psychology in Literature, the student reads the varied psychologies of Freud, Jung, Kohlberg, Frankl, and others and their application to the interpretation of world literature in a variety of genres. The student participates in in-depth discussions, research, and writing of critical papers to enhance student learning. Technology is used as a research, writing, and learning tool. This course must be taken in conjunction with Children’s Literature I.

CHILDREN’S LITERATURE I

2203N      1 Sem.      11-12

Prerequisite: None.
Special Requirements: None.
Description: In Children’s Literature I, the student reads and writes literature including various genre and literary elements with an early childhood audience in mind (ages birth to 8 years). Literature includes common universal themes represented in all genres for the appropriate age groups. The student effectively uses and models audio/visual presentation techniques in written, spoken, and technological form to engage young children and also researches media literacy as it pertains to young audiences. The student participates in project-based, thematic, and engaged-learning activities using technology as a learning tool. This course must be taken in conjunction with Psychology in Literature. This course grants elective credit.

√ *SPEECH I

23031      1 Yr.      9-12

Prerequisite: None
Special Requirements: Credit in a year of speech and a year of journalism will satisfy the Communication Skills requirement.
Description: Speech I provides a variety of informal and formal speaking experiences for the student who is interested in learning how to confidently stand in front of an audience and deliver effective oral presentations for a variety of purposes. The student understands the unique elements of different types of speeches, such as informative, persuasive, impromptu, dramatic humorous interpretation, and debate. The student also applies the process of speech-making or speech-writing, effective delivery techniques, and the concept of audience awareness. By the end of the course, the student is comfortable and confident speaking in front of a group and also is able to convey ideas logically and effectively. This course grants elective credit.

*SPEECH II

23032      1 Yr.      10-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Speech I.
Special Requirements: None.
Description: Speech II offers the student continued opportunities to reinforce and practice a variety of informal and formal speaking experiences. It is designed for the student who is interested in building on foundations learned in Speech I and in becoming increasingly effective and confident. The student becomes more self-directed with less guidance from the teacher. Speeches and oral presentations become more detailed, in-depth, and are delivered with increased fluidity and poise. In addition, the student practices and develops critical analysis skills and appropriate feedback techniques. This course grants elective credit.

*SPEECH III

23033      1 Yr.      11-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Speech II.
Special Requirements: None.
Description: In Speech III, the student refines and enhances speaking and presentation skills for a variety of audiences and purposes. Higher-order thinking skills are developed and conveyed in more challenging arenas, such as panel discussions, debate, and dramatic humorous interpretation with an expanded audience in the competitive arena. The student also mentors less experienced speakers and participates in peer coaching and team building activities in conjunction with intra-and inter-school competitions. The student must be willing to devote time before and after school hours to prepare for and actively participate in the co-curricular aspect of the course. This course grants elective credit.

*SPEECH IV

23034      1 Yr.      12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Speech III.
Special Requirements: None.
Description: In Speech IV, the student studies and practices the art of rhetoric in-depth using representative speeches from classic and modern-day orators. The student has increased opportunities to speak and present in front of a wider variety of audiences, to make public appearances on a regular basis, and to compete in state and national competitions with the school’s Speech and Debate Team. The student is able to express original ideas in a clear, logical, and effective manner. The student assumes increased leadership responsibilities as a role model, mentor, and peer coach for less experienced speakers both in class and in the competitive arena. The student must be willing to devote more time before and after school hours to prepare for, actively participate in, and help orchestrate the co-curricular aspect of the course. This course grants elective credit.

FILM CRITICISM

20538      1 Yr.      11-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 10 (or substitute).
Special Requirements: Elective if taken at Grade 11; will satisfy English requirement if taken at Grade 12.
Description: In Film Criticism, the student studies the history, development, and art form of the motion picture and its influence and reflection of society. The student studies the language of filmmaking, techniques of filmmaking, and literary and technical analysis as criteria for evaluating films and literature from around the world. The student also applies media literacy techniques by “reading” visual images as “texts” and by comparing/contrasting original novels and stories to corresponding screenplays.

NEWSPAPER I

24001      1 Yr.      10-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Journalism.
Special Requirements: Adviser approval.
Description: In Newspaper I, the student applies entry-level journalistic skills introduced in Journalism/Mass Communications and participates in specialized areas depending on interests and staffing needs. The student gains experience with cooperative and group processes in areas of planning, decision-making, conflict resolution, team building, business management, elements of design and photography, desktop publishing, time management, and “deadlining” with guidance, coaching, and mentoring from more advanced student editors and supervision from the teacher/adviser. The student generates authentic work by producing a series of newspapers for the school and community. Frequently students have the opportunity to compete for a variety of contests, awards, and scholarships. Much of the work is done outside of class. This course grants elective credit.

NEWSPAPER II

24002      1 Yr.      10-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Newspaper I.
Special Requirements: Adviser approval.
Description: In Newspaper II, the student enhances individual skills in all journalistic areas and also develops areas of expertise, specializing in one or more areas of the newspaper production process. The student also refines skills with group processes, such as decision-making, conflict resolution, and time management with respect to individual and staff deadlines and mentors less experienced staff members. The Newspaper II student is encouraged to assume increased responsibility and to develop skills that lead to editorial positions with mentoring and coaching from more experienced staff members and with guidance from the teacher/adviser. The student generates authentic work by producing a series of newspapers for the school and community. Frequently students have the opportunity to compete for a variety of contests, awards, and scholarships. Much of the work is done outside of class. This course grants elective credit.

NEWSPAPER III

24003      1 Yr.      11-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Newspaper II.
Special Requirements: Adviser approval.
Description: In Newspaper III, the student refines and enhances previous journalistic skills and assumes increasingly more challenging and demanding leadership and mentoring roles on the newspaper staff. As specified in the specific staff position description, the editor is responsible for long-range planning, reinforcing editorial policy, and operating the budget. The editor orchestrates the co-curricular aspect of the program in cooperation with other editors and the teacher/adviser. Besides writing and editing copy, advertising, art, and photography, the editor also coordinates desktop publishing according to printers’ specifications, within legal and ethical parameters, and within deadlines. The student generates authentic work by producing a series of newspapers for the school and community. Frequently students have the opportunity to compete for a variety of contests, awards, and scholarships. Much of the work is done outside of class. This course grants elective credit.

NEWSPAPER IV

24004      1 Yr.      12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Newspaper III.
Special Requirements: Adviser approval.
Description: In Newspaper IV, the student assumes more responsibility for visioning, leading, organizing, and mentoring less experienced editors and staff. As specified in the specific staff position description, the editor is responsible for long-range planning, reinforcing editorial policy, and operating the budget and orchestrating the co-curricular aspect of the program in cooperation with other editors and the teacher/adviser. Besides honing specialty areas of interests, the editor also supervises desktop publishing according to printers’ specifications within legal and ethical parameters and within deadlines. The Newspaper IV student models collaborative leadership qualities in addition to making the newspaper a viable and competitive medium. The student generates authentic work by producing a series of newspapers for the school and community. Frequently students have the opportunity to compete for a variety of contests, awards, and scholarships. Much of the work is done outside of class. This course grants elective credit.

*CREATIVE WRITING I

24540      1 Yr.      10-12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 9.
Special Requirements: Elective.
Description: In Creative Writing I, the student reads, analyzes, and discusses selected models of various American authors to gain a background for extensive original thought and writing. The student experiments with and creates working and showcase portfolios (traditional and/or electronic) representing best work in various genres (e.g., short stories, one-act plays, poetry, fiction, and non-fiction). As part of the creative process, the student identifies and concentrates on individual needs for vocabulary development, spelling, sentence structure, and revision and prepares freelance work for submission to publishers and contests. The student uses technology to support writing, research, and the procedures for submitting work for consideration to print online literary magazines. The creative writing class assists in producing the school’s literary magazine. Students will be expected to share their work in a writer's workshop setting. More than one half of the course work is devoted to composition.

*CREATIVE WRITING II

24541      1 Yr.      12

Prerequisite: Successful completion of Creative Writing I or teacher recommendation and presentation of a writing portfolio that shows familiarity with the conventions of multiple genres, including short story, narrative, dramatic and lyric poetry, drama, and non-fiction.
Special Requirements: Elective if taken in Grades 10-11. Will satisfy English requirement if taken at Grade 12.
Description: In Creative Writing II, the student advances discussion of selected models of various works from around the world to gain a background for extensive original writing. The student develops and refines working and showcase portfolios (traditional and/or electronic) representing best work in various genres, e.g., short stories, one-act plays, poetry, fiction, and non-fiction). As part of the creative process, the student refines technique and style and revises work through peer and self-editing. In addition, the student prepares freelance work for submission to contests and publishers. The student shares work in class discussions and uses technology to support writing, research, and procedures for submitting work for consideration to print an online literary magazine. The class assists in producing the school’s literary magazine. More than one half of the course work is devoted to composition. Students will be expected to share their work in a writers’ workshop setting.

√ ESL – LEVEL I

2055A-D 1 Yr. 9-12

Prerequisite: No knowledge of English or very limited. ACCESS Score of 1.0-1.9 or teacher recommendation.
Description: The Level I ESL class is offered to students who enter our school district with little or no understanding of English. The purpose is to provide these students with an opportunity to acquire English in a stress-free environment. The class enables them to participate physically, socially, emotionally, intellectually, and linguistically in meaningful situations as they acculturate to the school environment and the community. Skills taught cover the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing as well as cultural understanding.

√ ESL – LEVEL II

2055E-H      1 Yr.      9-12

Prerequisite: ESL Level I or teacher recommendation and/or test. ACCESS Score of 2.0-2.9 or teacher recommendation.
Special Requirements: None
Description: ESL Level II continues the process of acculturating students and helping them understand and produce more complex oral and written language. Language development is integrated with science, art, and other subjects. This enables students to function well in their content area classes. ESL Level II provides for the integration and reinforcement of listening comprehension, oral production, reading, and writing, as well as cultural understanding.