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LANGUAGE ARTS DEPARTMENT

 

Team Leaders:
Ashley Keilbarth
Michael Sanchez


Staff:

Kevin Balder

Martha Bedeaux

Maria Elena Casanova
Jerome Evans

Rosemary Hood
Doug Mattson

Trey Saxon

Susan Schripsema
Tanya Shaw
Casey Soto
Aimee Wray
Jim Zalewski

Eleventh Grade Program

Italicized wording is specific to La Cueva High School.
√ Freshmen may take this class.    *NCAA approved course.

 

The English program of La Cueva High School focuses on promoting excellence in all forms of communication, levels of critical thinking, and love of literature to the end that the students will be informed, involved, rational, compassionate, contributing citizens in their immediate, as well as the global society.

Students who take a Language Arts class for English credit (rather than elective credit) are expected to meet or exceed the New Mexico Language Arts Standards and Benchmarks. Students in all Language Arts classes apply and develop critical thinking skills through the six APS Language Arts Strands: Reading Process, Reading Analysis, Writing, Speaking, Listening/Viewing, and Research.

*ENGLISH 11

25051      1 Yr.      11

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 10 (or substitute.)
Special Requirements: None.
Description: In English 11, the student surveys selections from the literary history of America using a particular approach designed by the teacher and supported with appropriate instructional materials. Using a chronological approach, the student surveys selected samples from the Colonial Period (1607-1765) to the Post-Modern Period (1970 – Present) including political and social history and literary movements within each period. Using a thematic approach, the student surveys selections of American literature which includes the: Struggle for Independence, the American Dream, Individual Thought and Action, etc. Using a genre approach, the student surveys various time periods and themes in American literature through early journals, poetry, verse, sermons, oratory, short stories, novels, and plays. Regardless of the approach(es) used, the student applies critical thinking skills through reading, speaking, viewing and listening strands of language arts, through writing and research (50% of the course), and through the use of technology as a learning tool.

*AMERICAN HUMANITIES

21532 (AMHUM)      1 Yr.       11

Prerequisite: English 9 and English 10 and teacher recommendation.
Corequisite: Enrollment in American Humanities history AMHUM.
Special Requirements: Students in this course must be reading at or above grade level, and have good writing skills. This course is taught in a two-hour block by an English/History teacher or team.
Description: American Humanities combines American literature, history, and fine arts to study the ideals and traditions of our cultural heritage. This two-hour program grants 1 credit in English and 1 credit in U.S. History (see Social Studies). Some enrichment activities, including field trips and research projects, are part of the program. Students will apply standard usage in speaking, listening, and writing through the reading of American literature. One half of the course work in English is devoted to composition. This course is recommended preparation for post-secondary education. With a humanities or interdisciplinary approach, the student makes connections to corresponding time periods and themes through the study of U.S. History and/or other subject areas. Regardless of the approach(es) used, the student applies critical thinking skills through reading, speaking, viewing and listening strands of language arts, through writing and research (50% of the course), and through the use of technology as a learning tool.

*AP ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION 11

25058      Yr.      11

Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 10.
Special Requirements: In keeping with the policy of the College Board, AP classes are open enrollment. Outliers by Malcolm Gladwell is suggested summer reading.
Description: AP English Language & Composition is for students who demonstrate the highest level of ability and interest in language arts. AP students need a strong work ethic and willingness to complete challenging assignments. Students will focus on rhetorical analysis of mostly non-fiction texts recommended by the College Board Advanced Placement program, the argument, analysis, and the synthesis-essay. AP English Language & Composition is a weighted course that includes preparation for the AP exam in English Language and Composition. In AP English Language & Composition the student surveys selections of the literary history of America using a particular approach designed by the teacher and supported with appropriate instructional materials. With a chronological approach, the student surveys selected samples from the Colonial Period (1607-1765) to the Post-Modern Period (1970 – Present) including political and social history and literary movements within each period. With a thematic approach, the student surveys selections of American literature across time periods that are grouped by themes, (e.g. Struggle for Independence, the American Dream, Individual Thought and Action, etc.). With a genre approach, the student
surveys various time periods and themes in American literature through selected genres across time periods (e.g. early journals, poetry, verse, sermons, oratory, short stories,
novels, and plays, etc.). Regardless of the approach(es) used, the student applies critical thinking skills through reading, speaking, viewing and listening strands of language arts, through writing and research (50% of the course), and through the use of technology as a learning tool. This course earns a weighted grade.